FAQs
  1. What does it mean to become a chapter?
  2. What does it cost to start a Trips for Kids chapter?
  3. How long does the process take?
  4. What kind of support will I get?
  5. Is there an application?
  6. What else will Trips for Kids ask me to do?
  7. What do I get out of it?

What does it mean to become a chapter?

Becoming a Trips for Kids® chapter is simple. We sign a trademark agreement with you for no cost. This agreement requires you to use our name and logo and agree to adhere to our mission statement. We understand that your program may be slightly different than ours given the needs and resources of your community. Our main goal is to get kids out on bikes and to introduce them to another perspective of the world. Beyond that, we have faith that you will use your knowledge and expertise to design the best possible program for kids in your community.


What does it cost to start a Trips for Kids chapter?

You can start a Trips for Kids chapter without spending a dime, or you could start with a $10,000 budget. It depends on many variables. If you already have a garage full of bikes, you won't have to buy bikes; if you are affiliating with another agency, you won't need to pay IRS fees; and if you happen to own a van that can carry 15 bikes, you won't have to spend money on transportation. In general, start up costs include:

  • IRS filing fees (to obtain non-profit status): $400
  • Insurance: $365
  • Corporation papers: $250 (depends on the state)
  • Start up equipment: $8700

How long does the process take?

Becoming a chapter usually takes four to eight months. The process can be faster if (a) you already have 501(c)(3) non-profit status, (b) you have a group of people working with you, or (c) you have money available to acquire equipment.


What kind of support will I get?

Lots! That's our job here at Trips for Kids. We can help you develop your ride program. And, just as importantly, we can help you set-up and maintain your non-profit organization, by providing information on subjects such as:

  • How to apply for 501(c)(3) status
  • How to obtain equipment donations such as helmets and bikes
  • Insurance
  • Board recruitment and development
  • Fundraising

Once your chapter is established, we provide on-going chapter support.


Is there an application?

Click on how to join to get all the information about what we need from you before we will sign the trademark agreement with you. Whether you decide to become a Trips for Kids chapter or not, this information will be helpful in laying out the necessary steps to developing a successful ride program.


What else will Trips for Kids ask me to do?

After you send us the items on the list of requirements and we sign the trademark agreement with you, we try not to place too many demands on you. We have a mandatory Trips for Kids Policy that lists actions required by all chapters on all rides. In addition, we ask that you help develop a strong nationwide network by:

  • Adhering to the mission statement to the best of your abilities, providing low-income or inner-city kids with new opportunities;
  • Filling out a questionnaire every year that helps us track statistics and other information that we use for grant proposals and other purposes;
  • Using the Trips for Kids logo and name whenever possible so that our name and our mission becomes more familiar to people, which will enable us to get more kids out on bikes;
  • Contributing to the Trips for Kids community by joining our listserve and communicating with other Trips for Kids chapters.

What do I get out of it?

Bruce Coffman, director of Trips for Kids Kansas City, sums it up best: "Mountain biking truly is a wonderful activity. We who bike know the reasons, but the kids help remind us. The smiles, laughter, and priceless quotes, even the look of deserved exhaustion in their face - these things reinforce to us that what we're showing these kids is something uniquely good."

Have Questions?

Please contact us.

 

Don't Give Up

I learned that no matter how hard something is, don't give up cause in the end it all is worth the effort.

– Halimah, age 17 (San Francisco, CA)